Commentary, Fork Shoals, Fountain Inn, History, Moonville

Oldest brick structure in Greenville Co. to be saved!

Exciting news for Southern Greenville County and historic preservation! For years now many travelers along Augusta Road south of Ware Place have noticed a house hidden in trees and wondered about that roof and chimneys showing above the brush. Others, who remember it before the vegetation covered it, have been concerned about the unique structure and worried about its continued deterioration.

In this watercolor painting ca. 1890, Cedarhurst is shown during the Greek Revival period of architecture. The McCullough house stands in a curve along the Augusta Road in Southern Greenville County.

Several years ago Fork Shoals Historical Society (FSHS) helped the family clean brush away from the house, called Cedarhurst, and offered to do more. The family contacted the society in the spring of this year asking for that help. After much investigation and many discussions, the David McCulloughs of Asheville decided to donate the house to FSHS so that funding could be applied for and raised in order to save this historic home, which was built in 1812 by Joseph McCullough. This two hundred seven year old building is the oldest brick structure in Greenville County. It has been vacant for over 30 years and needs immediate attention. It is on the Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission’s Top 10 list of structures in danger of loss and has been placed under their oversight for the future.

National Park Service Grant recipients from Fork Shoals Historical Society meet with preservationist, Kyle Campbell (far left), to begin planning for the future of the ca. 1812 historic McCullough home in Southern Greenville County. (Left to right – Jim Scott, Cheryl MacKnight, Samantha Nifong, Susan Cali, Raymond Orr, Anne Peden, and Tom Stitt)♦

The McCulloughs have been well known in the history of Greenville County with the first three owners of the home being Joseph, whose land holdings by 1853 included a 15,000 acre plantation; Colonel James, who lead the 16th Regiment during the War Between the States; and the Judge, who was a noted lawyer in Greenville and Baltimore around the turn of the century. Each of these owners gave Cedarhurst a different style over the years; Federal, Greek Revival, and Colonial Revival. Those of us who remember the house remember the Colonial Revival home with the handmade brick covered in stucco. Cedarhurst stayed in the McCullough family until October when they deeded it to the society. In the spring when this transfer was being considered, FSHS applied for a grant to aid in planning for Cedarhurst’s future.

Fork Shoals is proud to announce that in September, the National Park Service and the State Historic Preservation Office bestowed a $10,000 matching funds grant to the Fork Shoals Historical Society to plan for the stabilization of Cedarhurst. The family and the society are thrilled to have this opportunity! These funds are for studying the current state of the building and planning the stabilization of the structure by hiring a professional to give the society guidance. FSHS has acquired the services of an upstate company, Preservation South, whose preservationist, Kyle Campbell, led the restoration of the Wilkins House (Jones Mortuary) which was moved to Mills Avenue in Greenville, the Goodwin House Inn in Northern Greenville, and locally, the Holly Spring African American School off the Belton Highway, among many others.

What an exciting time for preservation in Greenville County! This massive task will take a village, a county, a state, and maybe a nation. It will be an effort on the order of saving the Wilkins House. The vision for Cedarhurst is just forming, and Forks Shoals Historical Society, a 501c3 non-profit organization, covets your support to make this project successful. This grant is just the beginning and actual restoration costs could reach hundreds of thousands over time. If you are interested in assisting in this work in any way, please contact Anne Peden (acpeden07@gmail.com) or Jim Scott (PAIjas367@aol.com).

We would love to share more about our work with you or your group.♦

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